Fair Annie continued…

http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/fairannie.html

http://tachesterton.wordpress.com/2010/09/08/fair-annie/

http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=1885

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch062.htm

http://historybecauseitshere.weebly.com/uploads/1/2/9/3/12938817/fair_annie.pdf

http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=LoHa_10_4a

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Annie

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hind_Etin

Been thinking about martin Simpson’s arrangement of “Fair Annie” which seems to be a sort of theme tune for me and the first Martin Simpson arrangement I ever sat down and tried to figure out (in Csus2 tuning). Here are  (roughly) the lyrics (which I believe MS got chiefly from the Peter Bellamy version which I have on the “Fair Annie” CD listed here):

Apologies for not knowing the actual copyright holder (if any) of these lyrics.

“Comb back your hair, Fair Annie,” he said, “Comb it back into your crown.
For you must live a maiden’s life
When I bring my new bride home.”

“Oh, how can I look maidenlike When maiden I am none?
For six bonny boys have I had by you And a seventh coming on?

“Oh, you will bake my bread,” he said, “And you will keep my home.
And you will welcome my lady gay When I bring my new bride home.”

And on the door he’s hung a silken towel, Pinned with a silver pin,
That Fair Annie she might wipe her eyes As she went out and in.

Now, six months gone and nine comin’ on And she thought the time o’er-long.

So she’s taken a spyglass all in her hand And up to the tower she has run.

She has look-ed east, she has look-ed west, She has looked all under the sun,
And who should she see but Lord Thomas’s ship  a-bringin’ of his new bride home.

“Shall I dress in green?” she said, “Or shall I dress in black?
Shall I go down to the ragin’ main And send my soul to wrack?”

“Oh, you need not dress in green,” says her oldest son, “Nor you need not dress in black.
But throw you wide the great hall door And welcome my father back.”

And she’s serv-ed them with the best of the wine, Yes, she’s serv-ed them all ’round.
But she’s drunk water from the well
For to keep her spirits down.

And she’s wait-ed upon them all the livelong day, And she thought the time o’er long.
Then she’s taken her flute all in her hand
And up to her bower she has run.

She has fluted east, she has fluted west, She has fluted loud and shrill.

She says, ” I  wished my sons were seven greyhounds And I was a wolf on the hill.”

“Come downstairs,” the new bride said, “Oh, come down the stairs to me.

Pray tell me the name of your father dear, And I’ll tell mine to thee.”

“Well, King Douglas,it was my father’s name And Queen Chatryn was my mother;
And Sweet Mary, she was my sister dear And Prince Henry was my brother.”

“If King Douglas, it is your father’s name And Queen Chatryn is your mother,

Then I’m sure that I’m your sister dear As Prince Henry, he is our brother.”

“And I have seven ships out on the sea They are loaded to the brim.
And ye shall have the six of them and the seventh for to carry me home.

Yes, ye shall have the six of them When we’ve had Lord Thomas burned!”

“Comb back your hair, Fair Annie,” he said, “Comb it back into your crown.
For you must live a maiden’s life
When I bring my new bride home.”

Something that has never occurred to me until now is the subtle change of tense when Annie speaks directly to her sister – the use of the past tense, “King Douglas it was my father’s name…” I’ve also grown really fond of the “Ye” in the last two lines before the first verse is repeated.

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