Happy Ever After? Joan Aiken heroines expect more…

Joan Aiken

Suspense Group 1…and it doesn’t all end with romance! Joan Aiken’s  modern suspense novels, full of grown up heroines who are every bit as plucky and determined as Dido Twite, and who have just as many extraordinary adventures, are now all being re-published as EBooks.

Joan Aiken’s writing for adults drew on her own fairly colourful  life experience, as much as on her enjoyment of dramatic and sensational reading, and while she had planned since childhood to be a writer and carry on in her family profession, the early death of the husband she met at nineteen, had a profound effect on her, leaving her, in her twenties, free to pursue her chosen career, but with the financial responsibility for a young family – a combination which strongly marked not only her own personality but  that of her fictional heroines.

As one reader commented, she usually wrote about young women who found…

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A Story of Hope – Joan Aiken’s Ghost Mouse – coming to a live reading… — Joan Aiken

Watkyn, Comma – A story of hope What if you bought the house of your dreams – a ruin of course – but discovered, as Joan Aiken did, in her own home, that you were sharing it with a ghost? And what better metaphor is there for a ghost than a comma, a […]

via A Story of Hope – Joan Aiken’s Ghost Mouse – coming to a live reading… — Joan Aiken

A Matter of Time — e-Tinkerbell

When the twentieth century novelists decided that those plots which frame our lives and those masks we wear every day for the sake of conventions and society were no longer “interesting”, but rather, what’s hidden behind those masks, the very first victim to be sacrificed to the altar of modern narrative was time, or better, chronological time […]

via A Matter of Time — e-Tinkerbell

A beautiful and terrible thing — Calmgrove

J K Rowling: The Tales of Beedle the Bard. Translated from the original runes by Hermione Granger Bloomsbury 2008 (2007) Here is a set of Chinese boxes, fitting intricately one inside the other. As the title implies, a fifteenth-century bard called Beedle is said to have written them down in runes, subsequently translated by “the […]

via A beautiful and terrible thing — Calmgrove

An Féa Caol

An Féa Caol (David White’s Terz tuned guitar that I currently have guardianship of) has had a couple of days to aclimatise to being in Wales and to being subjected to my uncultured handling so I thought I ought to post a sound sample.
I’ve chosen my own arrangement of the Turlough OCarolan favourite “Sí Bheag, Sí Mhór”. It’s a single (third) take and recorded with an ageing Audio Technica MB4000C mic which refuses to run on phantom power so has an AA battery installed. I’ve had to get in close with the mic because it’s a little underpowered. I mention this because it hasn’t picked up the very sweet presence that An Féa Caol possesses though I hope I’ve managed to catch some of her sustain. Two files, the same recording (with quite a bit of ‘red recording light fever’ present) but the second with reverb. The tapping at the end of the files is click track spill, sorry.

Without reverb

With reverb

anthea at keiths

Return of the shadow — Calmgrove

“[The] shadow is that hidden, repressed, for the most part inferior and guilt-laden personality whose ultimate ramifications reach back into the realm of our animal ancestors. [It] can now be ascertained on closer investigation that the unconscious man, that is his shadow, does not consist only of morally reprehensible tendencies, but also displays a number […]

via Return of the shadow — Calmgrove